Find health and safety guidelines along with general visitor information for Greater Phoenix.

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Dog Days at the Garden

  • Desert Botanical Garden
    1201 N. Galvin Parkway Phoenix, AZ
  • Hosted by: Desert Botanical Garden
  • Dates: October 6, Oct 9, Oct 13, Oct 16, Oct 20, Oct 23, Oct 27, Oct 30, Nov 3, Nov 6, Nov 10, Nov 17, Nov 20, 2021
  • Time: 8:00 AM to 11:00 AM
  • Price: Adults, $24.95; ages 3-17, $14.95; children under 3, free
Overview
Location

Back by pup-ular demand! Dog Days are a perfect op-paw-tunity to walk the trails, heel for photo opps and meet other dog lovers amid the beauty of the Garden. Last Dog Admission: 10:30 – 10 a.m. timeslot.

  • Oct 6, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 27 & 30 | Nov. 3, 6, 10, 17 & 20 | 8 – 11 a.m.

The Garden Shop welcomes dogs during your visit. Dogs are not permitted in Gertrude’s Restaurant or the Butterfly Exhibit.

For the health and safety of guests and dogs, please note the following: 
  • Make sure you and your dog stay hydrated! Hydration Stations are located throughout the Garden.
  • Clean up after your dog and deposit bagged waste in trash receptacles.
  • Dogs must be on leash, licensed, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
  • Owners must maintain control of their dogs at all times.
  • Any dogs deemed to be aggressive to humans or other dogs will be asked to leave the Garden.
  • Watch those noses and paws! Be alert to cactus pieces and other debris on the trails and do not allow dogs to wander off trail.
  • Be aware of your dog’s limits and monitor your pet for signs of heat stress.
Heat Advisory
  • Owners should pay attention to their dog’s known heat tolerance. Dogs with heavy coats or low heat tolerance may want to visit another day.
  • Rangers will be present and alert on the trails to make sure that our dog guests are doing okay.
  • Do you have dog booties/socks or a pet stroller? Feel free to bring them to the Garden.

Tips to keep your dog safe in our warm desert climate:

  • Don’t leave your pets in a parked car | Just don’t do it, not even for a minute. When it’s 72 degrees outside, the temperature in your car can get up to 116 degrees within an hour.
  • Limit exercise on hot days | On hot days, limit exercise to the early morning or evening hours. This can be a good way to avoid burning your dog’s paws on the hot asphalt.
  • Watch those paws | Much like human feet, dogs’ footpads can burn on concrete, especially during an Arizona summer. The best rule of them is that if it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for them. Use the back of your hand or bottom of your foot to test the ground, especially around midday. Dog booties and socks can help protect against the hot ground.
  • Provide ample shade and water | Trees and tarps will give you plenty of shade without obstructing air flow.
  • Look for signs of heat stress | Heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid pulse, a staggering gait, vomiting or a deep red or purple tongue are signs that your pet is overheated.

Here’s what to do if your pet is suffering from heatstroke:

  • Move your pet into the shade or an air-conditioned area. Apply ice packs or cold towels to their head, neck and chest or run cool (not cold) water over them. Let them drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. Take them directly to a veterinarian.
  • Watch the humidity | When the monsoon rolls around in June, remember that humidity can affect your pet as well as heat. Because animals pant to cool off, they may be unable to cool themselves if the humidity is too high.
  • Don’t rely on a fan | Fans don’t cool off pets as effectively as they do people because they respond differently to heat.

Desert Botanical Garden

1201 N. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix
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